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CDC: 1 in 8 US Workers Has Some Hearing Loss
CDC: 1 in 8 US Workers Has Some Hearing Loss
Nearly 13 percent of U.S. workers suffer from at least some hearing loss, a new federal government study finds. And 2 percent of the more than 1.4 million workers tested across nine industry sectors between 2003 and 2012 had "moderate or worse" hearing...
Our Kids Caught a $1,000 Cough
Our Kids Caught a $1,000 Cough
One winter week, my 7-year-old twins started with stuffed noses and sore throats. We did what parents typically do: We broke out the throat spray, the cough syrup, the decongestant. Instead of going away, the problem got worse.
How a Tool to Help Patients Save on Healthcare Backfired
How a Tool to Help Patients Save on Healthcare Backfired
A recent study suggests that transparency tools alone aren't going to lead to much, if any, savings. The study followed healthcare spending at two large employers that offered a web tool that allowed patients to easily shop around and save on healthcar...
Study: E-Cigarettes Poison More Young Kids
Study: E-Cigarettes Poison More Young Kids
Electronic cigarettes have sickened rising numbers of young children, a study of U.S. poison center calls has found. Most cases involve swallowing liquid nicotine.
CDC Painkiller Guidelines Aim to Reduce Addiction Risk
CDC Painkiller Guidelines Aim to Reduce Addiction Risk
In an effort to curb what many consider the worst public health drug crisis in decades, the federal government published the first national standards for prescription painkillers, recommending that doctors try pain relievers, like ibuprofen, before pre...
Cancer Deaths Rose During the Recession. But Why?
Cancer Deaths Rose During the Recession. But Why?
Healthy countries experienced a small uptick in cancer deaths during the global economic crisis, according to a new study — an estimated 260,000 excess deaths between 2008 and 2010.
Well-Educated Spouses May Keep Docs from Practicing Rurally
Well-Educated Spouses May Keep Docs from Practicing Rurally
Doctors are increasingly marrying other well-educated people with careers, and that may be exacerbating the shortage of doctors in already underserved rural areas of the U.S., suggests new research.
FDA to Extend Tobacco Regulations to E-Cigarettes, Other Products
FDA to Extend Tobacco Regulations to E-Cigarettes, Other Products
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it will regulate all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, cigars, hookah tobacco and pipe tobacco, among others. Until now, the FDA could only regulate cigarettes and cigarette-related products ...
'Liquid' Cancer Test Offers Hope for Alternative to Painful Biopsies
'Liquid' Cancer Test Offers Hope for Alternative to Painful Biopsies
A blood test to detect cancer mutations produced results that generally agree with those of an invasive tumor biopsy, researchers reported, heralding a time when diagnosing cancer and monitoring its progression may become less painful and risky.
The 5 Best Remedies for Sinus Problems
The 5 Best Remedies for Sinus Problems
Here's an appetizing tidbit: Your sinus produces one to two liters of mucus every day — that's the size of two large soda bottles.
Discovery of Cancer Gene May Predict Survival in Patients with Mouth Cancers
Discovery of Cancer Gene May Predict Survival in Patients with Mouth Cancers
A newly discovered tumor gene may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. If the gene is expressed (turned on), patients are 4.6 times more likely to die at any given time. The finding could help guide treatme...
The Plastic Surgery Trend That's Skyrocketing in the US
The Plastic Surgery Trend That's Skyrocketing in the US
A record number of Americans underwent lip augmentation procedures in 2015, making them the second ­fastest growing facial procedure in the United States since 2000, according to new data from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.
Why Your Ears Pop on Planes, and How to Fix It
Why Your Ears Pop on Planes, and How to Fix It
We've all felt it: A plane descends, pressure inside the cabin changes, and our ears may pop. Normally, a yawn or two should clear any discomfort. But sometimes, as anyone who has flown with a cold knows, the pressure shift can cause real pain.
The Cancer Almanac
The Cancer Almanac
For decades, science has classified cancers by the organ or system in which they begin. That taxonomy is slowly being replaced — but it's still the indispensable way to understand the odds.
Losses in Smell,Taste Are Common with Age; Can Cause Big Trouble
Losses in Smell,Taste Are Common with Age; Can Cause Big Trouble
The first obvious clue might be a burnt piece of toast or a grandbaby's dirty diaper. You see it — and realize you should have smelled it. But you missed it, because your sense of smell that is not what it used to be. And, because the two senses ...
The List of Cancers That Can Be Treated by Immunotherapy Keeps Growing
The List of Cancers That Can Be Treated by Immunotherapy Keeps Growing
New immunotherapy drugs are showing significant and extended effectiveness against a broadening range of cancers, including rare and intractable tumors often caused by viruses. Scientists reported on two new studies showing that the medications, which ...
What Your Snot Can Tell You about Your Health
What Your Snot Can Tell You about Your Health
We don't usually spend much time thinking about our snot — until it starts coming out of our noses. Then we blow it, and wipe it, and, yes, look at it, all the while trying to figure out what's really going on.
Social Smokers Face Real Risks, Too
Social Smokers Face Real Risks, Too
Smoking, even socially, is linked to an increased risk of brain bleeding, according to a new study reported in the journal Stroke. That seems to be especially true for women, who are known to have a higher risk for brain bleeding than men.
Study: Patients Carry Superbugs on Their Hands
Study: Patients Carry Superbugs on Their Hands
Hospitals may be cracking down on handwashing for doctors, nurses and other staffers, but they're missing a big source of superbug spread, a new study finds: Patients.
Scientists: 'Second Skin' May Reduce Wrinkles, Eye Bags
Scientists: 'Second Skin' May Reduce Wrinkles, Eye Bags
The idea sounds like fantasy: an invisible film that can be painted on your skin and give it the elasticity of youth. Bags under the eyes vanish in seconds. Wrinkles disappear.
Study Ties Certain Mouth Germs to Pancreatic Cancer Risk
Study Ties Certain Mouth Germs to Pancreatic Cancer Risk
A new study suggests a possible link between certain germs found in the mouth and a heightened risk of pancreatic cancer.
Telemedicine Goes More Mainstream, but Cost Remains Obstacle
Telemedicine Goes More Mainstream, but Cost Remains Obstacle
Virtual healthcare — whether by phone, text or video — is rapidly becoming more common, but a new study says it's being stymied because doctors and hospitals can't afford to roll it out faster.
We Treat Hearing Loss As An Inevitable Cost of War; It Shouldn't Be
We Treat Hearing Loss As An Inevitable Cost of War; It Shouldn't Be
Military veteran Stephen Carlson writes: I don't remember the moment the bomb went off, but I do know that when I landed, stunned, at the bottom of the gun turret of my vehicle, blood was leaking from my ears.
Heartburn Drugs Tied to Dementia Risk
Heartburn Drugs Tied to Dementia Risk
The popular heartburn drugs known as proton pump inhibitors have been linked to a range of ills: bone fractures, kidney problems, infections and more. Now a large new study has found that they are associated with an increased risk for dementia as well.
Loose Bristles from Grill-Cleaning Brushes May Pose Dangers
Loose Bristles from Grill-Cleaning Brushes May Pose Dangers
A new study suggests that you might want to take one last look after cleaning your grill this summer, to make sure no bristles from your wire brush are left behind.
Little Research into Benefits of Wearing Earplugs to Concerts
Little Research into Benefits of Wearing Earplugs to Concerts
A review of the literature turned up only two high quality studies that looked at whether wearing earplugs to music venues will prevent hearing loss and tinnitus directly afterward.
Drowning Risks: Even Kiddie Pools Pose Danger
Drowning Risks: Even Kiddie Pools Pose Danger
Just a few inches of water in a kiddie pool are enough to drown a child.
The Burden of Cancer Isn't Just Cancer
The Burden of Cancer Isn't Just Cancer
Money is low on the list of things most people want to think about after a doctor says the scary word "cancer." And it's not just patients — physicians also want to weigh the best treatment options to rout the cancer, unburdened by financial nitt...
He Couldn't Eat, Drink or Work; Doctors Couldn't Explain His Searing Pain
He Couldn't Eat, Drink or Work; Doctors Couldn't Explain His Searing Pain
Kim Pace was afraid he was dying. In six months, he had lost more than 30 pounds because a terrible stabbing sensation on the left side of his face made eating or drinking too painful. Brushing his teeth was out of the question and even the slightest t...
5 Mistakes You're Making Cleaning Your Ears
5 Mistakes You're Making Cleaning Your Ears
Earwax is, well, pretty gross, so it's no wonder most of us reach for cotton swabs on a regular basis. But here's the rub: There's a good chance you're putting your ears and your hearing at risk with every wax removal attempt.
Study: Pioneering Approach to Prevent Peanut Allergies in Children Provides Ongoing Protection
Study: Pioneering Approach to Prevent Peanut Allergies in Children Provides Ongoing Protection
A pioneering approach to prevent peanut allergies in children offers them ongoing protection after the youngsters stop eating the peanut protein that immunized them against the potentially fatal reaction, according to a recent study.
Why You Don't Need Antibiotics for Sinus Infections
Why You Don't Need Antibiotics for Sinus Infections
If you've been knocked out by a sinus infection — stuffiness, face pain or pressure and nasal discharge — it's likely your doctor will recommend you wait it out for a week or so before resorting to an antibiotic. That's because U.S. health ...
Study: Mom's Voice Works Like a Charm on Your Brain
Study: Mom's Voice Works Like a Charm on Your Brain
Less than one second. That's how long it takes children to recognize their mother's voice. And that voice lights a child's brain up like a Christmas tree.
Scientists Find Microbiotic Treasure Hidden in the Nose
Scientists Find Microbiotic Treasure Hidden in the Nose
Your mother told you early and often not to stick your finger up there. But scientists say they have reached into the human nose and picked out something really special - a potential new medicine to combat the dreaded MRSA bacteria.
Study: Cancer-Causing HPV Plummeted in Teens Since Vaccine
Study: Cancer-Causing HPV Plummeted in Teens Since Vaccine
The human papillomavirus vaccine was first recommended for adolescent girls in the United States in 2006. Since that time, the prevalence of the cancer-causing virus has been dropping among young women, according to a new study.
Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking Skills
Sleep Apnea May Take Toll on Your Mood, Thinking Skills
Sleep apnea may have an impact on brain function, new research suggests. People with sleep apnea have lower levels of GABA and abnormally high levels of glutamate, according a study published online recently.
Many Parents Unaware of Newborn Hearing Screenings
Many Parents Unaware of Newborn Hearing Screenings
Many parents don't remember if their children were tested for hearing loss at birth, a new study found.
The FDA, for Only the Second Time Ever, Wants to Ban a Medical Device. Here's Why.
The FDA, for Only the Second Time Ever, Wants to Ban a Medical Device. Here's Why.
Powdered medical gloves — the kind used in surgery or to examine patients — would be ordered off the market under a new proposal by the Food and Drug Administration. That would put the gloves in an exclusive club — only one other dev...
5 Reasons You Should Never Take Thyroid Supplements
5 Reasons You Should Never Take Thyroid Supplements
Their ingredients and effects are surprising — and sometimes harmful.
Very Hot Drinks Are 'Probably Carcinogenic'
Very Hot Drinks Are 'Probably Carcinogenic'
In a review published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the cancer agency of the World Health Organization, drinking very hot beverages was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans." More specifically, the review by a panel of g...
When Patients Are a Pain for Their Doctors
When Patients Are a Pain for Their Doctors
Difficult patients are more than just an annoyance for doctors. They actually get worse care. A new study found that difficult patients have a greater chance of receiving a misdiagnosis because their behavior distracts doctors.
Study: To Quit Smoking, It's Best to Go Cold Turkey
Study: To Quit Smoking, It's Best to Go Cold Turkey
Just rip off the bandage; dive into the freezing water; close your eyes and take it. For cigarette smokers who waver at the edge of a decision to quit and consider strategies to ease the transition, a new study finds that the all-in approach is more li...
Smokers Urged to Switch to E-Cigarettes by British Medical Group
Smokers Urged to Switch to E-Cigarettes by British Medical Group
Taking a stance sharply at odds with most American public health officials, a major British medical organization urged smokers to switch to electronic cigarettes, saying they are the best hope in generations for people addicted to tobacco cigarettes to...
An Easy Fix for Vertigo
An Easy Fix for Vertigo
The first time it happened, in 2011, Bob Amberger thought he might be having a stroke. A retired real estate agent and contractor in Modesto, California, he awoke one morning, started to climb out of bed and felt the room whirling around him.
Study: Earplugs Help Prevent Hearing Loss Tied to Loud Concerts
Study: Earplugs Help Prevent Hearing Loss Tied to Loud Concerts
A new study confirms a common-sense notion: Earplugs can shield you from the temporary hearing loss that can happen after a high-decibel music concert.
Infant Ear Infections Becoming Less Common
Infant Ear Infections Becoming Less Common
Painful ear infections remain a scourge of childhood, but fewer American babies are getting them now compared with 20 years ago, new research shows.
Robot Stitches Tissue by Itself, a Step to More Automated OR
Robot Stitches Tissue by Itself, a Step to More Automated OR
Getting stitched up by Dr. Robot may one day be reality: Scientists have created a robotic system that did just that in living animals without a real doctor pulling the strings.
Study: Young Children with Sleep Apnea May Face Learning Difficulties
Study: Young Children with Sleep Apnea May Face Learning Difficulties
Sleep apnea in young children may affect youngsters' attention, memory and language development, a new study suggests.
New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions in the ER
New Tools Help Patients Make Tough Decisions in the ER
In the emergency room, patients may expect doctors to call all the shots about tests and treatments. But increasingly, ER physicians are asking patients to participate more in critical decisions about care, such as whether to opt for surgery or undergo...
The Facts Behind E-Cigarettes and Their Health Risks
The Facts Behind E-Cigarettes and Their Health Risks
E-cigarettes, also known as e-cigs or electronic nicotine delivery systems, have been on the market for about a decade and are surging in popularity. But there’s widespread disagreement about their safety or any benefits they may have.
It's Not Cancer: Doctors Reclassify a Thyroid Tumor
It's Not Cancer: Doctors Reclassify a Thyroid Tumor
An international panel of doctors has decided that a type of tumor that was classified as a cancer is not a cancer at all. As a result, they have officially downgraded the condition, and thousands of patients will be spared removal of their thyroid, tr...
A Third of Antibiotic Prescriptions Are Just Wrong
A Third of Antibiotic Prescriptions Are Just Wrong
Nearly a third of all prescriptions written for antibiotics are just not needed, according to a new report issued Tuesday. Despite decades of ever-more-frantic warnings from health officials, doctors are still writing prescriptions for colds, ear infec...
Antitrust Suits Aim to Block Two Healthcare Mergers
Antitrust Suits Aim to Block Two Healthcare Mergers
The Obama administration announced it will seek to block two giant healthcare mergers, citing concerns that the deals could drive up healthcare premiums, undermine innovation and reduce competition.